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Study Shows Acupuncture Helps Ease High Blood Pressure

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Acupuncture Holds Promise For Relieving High Blood Pressure According To Study

Acupuncture, an integral part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practice, brings a new perspective to treatment of high blood pressure issues. In TCM, the objective is to restore health by bringing the body back into balance. It is believed that any illness or health concern is caused by something in the body being out of balance. High blood pressure can be a sign that something in a patient’s life needs to change, to be brought into a proper balance. Acupuncture shows great promise for helping with this.

Based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are roughly 70 million Americans who suffer from high blood pressure. Of these, approximately half are estimated to have the problem under control. High blood pressure is expensive. It not only damages health and negatively affects lifestyle, it also costs billions of dollars a year in treatments, lost work time, medications, etc.

The research discussed below suggests that with regular use, electroacupuncture can help with successful treatment and management of high blood pressure.

Continue reading for more details about this ground-breaking study of how acupuncture can help treat high blood pressure! Please share with others.

 

Can acupuncture benefit people with mildly or moderately elevated blood pressure?

Perhaps, a small study suggests, but the researchers behind the trial acknowledge that it’s too soon to say for sure.

The researchers found that blood pressure levels declined slightly in a small group of patients treated 30 minutes a week with “electroacupuncture” — where the needles carry low-level electrical stimulation — at specific points of the body.

“Potentially, blood pressure can be kept low with a monthly follow-up treatment,” said study co-author Dr. John Longhurst, a cardiologist at the University of California, Irvine.

An estimated 70 million U.S. adults — one in three — have high blood pressure, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s believed that only half have their condition under control. High blood pressure can lead to stroke and heart disease.

Blood pressure can often be lowered by becoming more fit, taking medications or both. But these approaches don’t work for everyone, and medication can cause side effects, especially among the elderly.

Read More @ WebMD

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